Can being a firefighter cause cancer?

Cancer is a leading cause of death among firefighters, and research suggests firefighters are at higher risk of certain types of cancers when compared to the general population. January is Firefighter Cancer Awareness Month. Learn more about firefighters’ cancer risk and what can be done to reduce the risk.

Can you get cancer from being a firefighter?

Firefighters have a 9 percent higher risk of being diagnosed with cancer and a 14 percent higher risk of dying from cancer than the general U.S. population, according to research by the CDC/National Institute for Occupational Health and Safety (NIOSH).

What type of cancer do firefighters get?

The original studies (n = 104) analyzed in the SRs were published between 1959 and 2018. The results consistently reported a significant increase in the incidence of rectal, prostate, bladder and testicular cancers as well as mesothelioma and malignant melanoma in firefighters compared to the general population.

Do firefighters have a greater risk of cancer?

In addition to the danger of putting out fires, firefighters are at an increased risk for different types of cancer due to the smoke and hazardous chemicals they are exposed to in the line of duty. There have been multiple studies that show this increased risk for cancer.

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What are the long term effects of being a firefighter?

Firefighters are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease, pulmonary disease, cancer, and noise-induced hearing loss. Occupational medical care for firefighters needs to monitor for these long-term health risks.

Do firefighters have health problems?

Firefighters face serious risks on the job such as heat exhaustion, burns, physical and mental stress. Additionally, they frequently come into contact with high levels of carbon monoxide and other toxic hazards. With these dangerous exposures, this line of work presents a likelihood for many diseases.

What is the number 1 killer of firefighters?

Cancer is now the number one cause of death among firefighters. According to data from the nonprofit Firefighter Cancer Support Network (active in the USA and Canada) cancer caused 66% of the career firefighter line-of-duty deaths from 2002 to 2019.

Do firefighters have shorter life expectancy?

Firefighters have shorter life expectancies than the average population and are three times more likely to die on the job, partly due to inherent risks, physical and mental stresses, and exposures to toxic and carcinogenic compounds released in smoke (source: US Bureau of Labor Statistics, University of Cincinnati).

What toxins are firefighters exposed to?

The results indicate that firefighters are frequently exposed to significant concentrations of hazardous materials including carbon monoxide, benzene, sulphur dioxide, hydrogen cyanide, aldehydes, hydrogen chloride, dichlorofluoromethane, and particulates.

Do firefighters get lung cancer?

Conclusions: We found no evidence of an excess lung cancer risk related to occupational exposure as a firefighter.

What is the life expectancy of a firefighter?

The average life expectancy at age 60 for police and firefighters was 24 years for men and 26 years for women. For non-police and fire, the comparable figures were 25 years for men and 27 years for women – just one year longer! And the pattern was quite consistent across states and localities.

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Are firefighters uniforms toxic?

A recent study shows that the turnout gear firefighters wear is full of chemicals to keep it dry, but those chemicals, known as PFAS, have been known to be toxic and may be contributing to diseases.

What are the cons of being a firefighter?

Here are five cons that may accompany a firefighter’s job:

  • Constant training. Firefighters undergo extensive and constant training throughout their careers. …
  • Long shifts. …
  • Dangerous job. …
  • Mentally demanding. …
  • Physically demanding.

How safe is firefighting?

Firefighter’s risk factor per 100,000 workers adjusted for time at risk is 128. This puts firefighters at the top of the fatality risk list equal to timber cutters/logging at 128.